Aquinas on Transubstantiation: Christology (pt. III)

Introduction I have always considered the doctrine of “the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist” to be riddled with problems both logical and biblical in all of its expressions. This series is dedicated to exploring those concerns by interacting with one of the most brilliant minds to defend the doctrine, Thomas Aquinas (although he is only representing the Roman Catholic view of Transubstantiation). All … Continue reading Aquinas on Transubstantiation: Christology (pt. III)

Aquinas on Transubstantiation: On Augustine (pt. II)

Introduction I have always considered the doctrine of “the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist” to be riddled with problems both logical and biblical in all of its expressions. This series is dedicated to exploring those concerns by interacting with one of the most brilliant minds to defend the doctrine, Thomas Aquinas (although he is only representing the Roman Catholic view of Transubstantiation). All … Continue reading Aquinas on Transubstantiation: On Augustine (pt. II)

Chrysostom on the Written Word

John Chrysostom (347-407) is widely considered to be one of the greatest preachers of the Christian church. His homilies that have been passed down to us are a rich treasure. Although his tongue was sharper than his mind, his theological insights no doubt carry much weight. His opening homily on the book of Matthew is particularly interesting. He begins the sermon series on Matthew with … Continue reading Chrysostom on the Written Word

Aquinas on Transubstantiation (pt. I)

I have always considered what is referred to as “the real presence of Christ” in the elements of the Lord’s Supper to be riddled with problems both logical and biblical in all of its expressions (Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Lutheranism). This series is dedicated to exploring those concerns by interacting with one of the most brilliant minds to defend the doctrine, Thomas Aquinas. All of … Continue reading Aquinas on Transubstantiation (pt. I)

Ignatius on Venerating the Saints

Better yet, coax the wild beasts, so that they may become my tomb and leave nothing of my body behind, lest I become a burden to anyone one I have fallen asleep. Then I will truly be a disciple of Christ, when the world will no longer see my body. (Ignatius to the Romans, 4:2) Ignatius wrote a series of “goodbye letters” to many churches … Continue reading Ignatius on Venerating the Saints

Jesus, Calvin, and Holidays

Jesus and Tradition Jesus’ condemnation of Pharisaical traditions seems to supply a sufficient blow to the Regulative Principle of Worship (RPW). Now when the Pharisees gathered to [Jesus], with some of the scribes who had come from Jerusalem, they saw that some of his disciples ate with hands that were defiled, that is, unwashed. (For the Pharisees and all the Jews do not eat unless they wash their … Continue reading Jesus, Calvin, and Holidays

Cyril of Jerusalem Affirmed Sola Scriptura

Cyril of Jerusalem is one of the Christian church’s very early Fathers, and he seems to be one of the strongest testimonies we have to historically lineage of the Protestant understanding of Sola Scriptura. Cyril delivered a number of “Catechetical Lectures.”  In his day, catechism was long series of educational training one would go through before being baptized into the Christian faith. In short, these … Continue reading Cyril of Jerusalem Affirmed Sola Scriptura

Does The Didache Teach a Eucharistic Sacrifice?

Catholic apologist Trent Horn recently released a lecture titled, “Answering Protestant Distortions of the Church Fathers.” Aptly titled, I will spare you a summary of the lecture. I would like to refute one of his arguments he made about the Didache. In the lecture, Mr. Horn began to discuss just how early we can find “the description of the Mass as a sacrifice.” Challenging a … Continue reading Does The Didache Teach a Eucharistic Sacrifice?

Brian Zahnd and Biblical Epistemology

Introduction: “I accept the Bible as authoritative in Christian faith and here’s how it works:” Brian Zahnd has made the news in my blog-world yet again. Only this time it’s not for the usual reason (attacking Penal Substitution). Rather, he made noise on my Twitter feed in a peculiar way (you can follow my brief exchange with him here.) Zahnd has been flirting with Eastern … Continue reading Brian Zahnd and Biblical Epistemology

Galatians and the Papacy

Paul’s Autobiographical Defense While preaching through the book of Galatians, a portion of the chapter became an interesting look into the first century relations between the people of God and the Apostles, and it dawned on me how powerful of a testimony this passage is against the claims of the Papacy from the Roman Catholic Church. When one reads through or thinks about the book … Continue reading Galatians and the Papacy