Jesus, Calvin, and Holidays

Jesus and Tradition Jesus’ condemnation of Pharisaical traditions seems to supply a sufficient blow to the Regulative Principle of Worship (RPW). Now when the Pharisees gathered to [Jesus], with some of the scribes who had come from Jerusalem, they saw that some of his disciples ate with hands that were defiled, that is, unwashed. (For the Pharisees and all the Jews do not eat unless they wash their … Continue reading Jesus, Calvin, and Holidays

Cyril of Jerusalem Affirmed Sola Scriptura

Cyril of Jerusalem is one of the Christian church’s very early Fathers, and he seems to be one of the strongest testimonies we have to historically lineage of the Protestant understanding of Sola Scriptura. Cyril delivered a number of “Catechetical Lectures.”  In his day, catechism was long series of educational training one would go through before being baptized into the Christian faith. In short, these … Continue reading Cyril of Jerusalem Affirmed Sola Scriptura

Does The Didache Teach a Eucharistic Sacrifice?

Catholic apologist Trent Horn recently released a lecture titled, “Answering Protestant Distortions of the Church Fathers.” Aptly titled, I will spare you a summary of the lecture. I would like to refute one of his arguments he made about the Didache. In the lecture, Mr. Horn began to discuss just how early we can find “the description of the Mass as a sacrifice.” Challenging a … Continue reading Does The Didache Teach a Eucharistic Sacrifice?

Brian Zahnd and Biblical Epistemology

Introduction: “I accept the Bible as authoritative in Christian faith and here’s how it works:” Brian Zahnd has made the news in my blog-world yet again. Only this time it’s not for the usual reason (attacking Penal Substitution). Rather, he made noise on my Twitter feed in a peculiar way (you can follow my brief exchange with him here.) Zahnd has been flirting with Eastern … Continue reading Brian Zahnd and Biblical Epistemology

Galatians and the Papacy

Paul’s Autobiographical Defense While preaching through the book of Galatians, a portion of the chapter became an interesting look into the first century relations between the people of God and the Apostles, and it dawned on me how powerful of a testimony this passage is against the claims of the Papacy from the Roman Catholic Church. When one reads through or thinks about the book … Continue reading Galatians and the Papacy

Honor Thy Fathers?

In dealing with Roman Catholic apologetics as long as I have, I am no stranger to discussions about the Early Church Fathers. There is a tendency for Protestants to very carefully pick and choose what quotes to share and which to ignore… It is for this reason that I wonder why Protestants are fascinated with the Fathers at all. Protestants necessarily have to discard or … Continue reading Honor Thy Fathers?

Matt Walsh and Predestination

Facts don’t care about your feelings. That is the tagline made popular by Ben Shapiro, a well-known political analyst. He is Jewish (religiously and ethnically), and is very conservative politically. Shapiro heads up The Daily Wire, an organization filled with helpful political commentary from a conservative perspective. One of his more recent hires was an already famous blogger, Matt Walsh. Walsh is like Shapiro. Not a … Continue reading Matt Walsh and Predestination

Andy Stanley, the Ten Commandments, and Public Outrage

Those who know me personally, or follow my blog with a degree of religiosity know that I am not a fan of Andy Stanley. I do not support his ministry or recommend his work to Christians. What began as the bad ecclesiology of the seeker-sensitive mega-church movement has evolved into dangerous theological positions, many which have been very controversial of late. Stanley recently found himself in … Continue reading Andy Stanley, the Ten Commandments, and Public Outrage

Francis and the Future of Roman Catholicism

Half a decade ago, when I was at university, I attended a public discussion the theatre department put on about homosexuality. Two separate panels discussed the issue. First, there was a panel of professors from the school. They had no diversity, all shared the same view on homosexuality. Then a religious panel was brought on to the stage to discuss the issue. Represented was a … Continue reading Francis and the Future of Roman Catholicism